7 comments on “Ubuntu Going Beyond a ‘Distribution’

  1. Pingback: Mohan P Ram (mohanpram) 's status on Friday, 23-Oct-09 20:54:14 UTC - Identi.ca

  2. I agree with you that UbuntuOne is something that only Ubuntu or a few more “big” linux enterprises can bring to the end user, but I think that Ubuntu is trying to bring more than a file sync on the cloud. In my opinion Ubuntu’s aim is to offer something different from the other linux distros (or even something different from the other operative systems). I mean, there are some other file sync programs that work very well in all OSs (I have in mind DropBox, but I think there are some more), but UbuntuOne is going to bring some other synchronization options like tomboy’s notes or evolution’s mail contacts, so the final user could see that for some purposes Ubuntu could be an easier way to manage a computer.

    I think that offering those “new services” is going to be a very good way to spread Ubuntu to the world (like Opera Browser does with it’s new features, even if its marketshare is not growing as fast as it should).

    On the other hand, as I’ve said at the beginning, I agree with you that even if it’s open source, this feature is limited to distros that have resources. I’ve read (I don’t remember where exactly) that UbuntuOne should work (at least) with debian testing and Ubuntu-derived distros, so it’s going to be an Ubuntu’s family feature, not only an Ubuntu’s unique feature.

    The time will say what’s the truth about this all…

  3. As I understand it, this isn’t exactly true, since the interface to Ubuntu One is an open standard so any other distro could implement its own client and use Ubuntu One that way.

    Still, it’s a bit disappointing to see U go down this road. We’ll see where it leads…

  4. Thanks for the comments folks! 🙂

    A.b. – That’s an interesting point; it will be interesting to see where this all goes.

    Adam – You are right, the interface is open, but the backend server is not. It would be interesting to see exactly how the service is marketed. Perhaps Canonical will open the service to other distributions, but that in itself would be an interesting situation. Might Canonical charge money to the other distros for the port? Then, how prevalent would the Ubuntu brand be within the program on other distros? Like you say, we’ll see where it leads.

  5. Pingback: Links 24/10/2009: Fedora 12 Beta and Linux Mint 7 KDE Reviewed | Boycott Novell

  6. Pingback: Links : Fedora 12 Beta and Linux Mint 7 KDE Reviewed | TheUnical Technologies Blog

  7. I understand that offering those “new services” is a best way to spread Ubuntu to the world (like Opera Browser does with it’s new features, even if its marketshare is not growing as fast as it should.

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